Traditional recipes

Tom Collins Season

Tom Collins Season

Summer's the perfect time to sip on the Tom Collins cocktail

Summer is the perfect season for a Tom Collins.

There are few drinks that embody a season as well as the Tom Collins. The deliciously refreshing combination of lemon juice, simple syrup, gin, and club soda is the personification of summer. And fortunately, you still have a couple weeks to brush up before the solstice.

The Tom Collins was invented in London in the 1820s, according to award-winning author and Liquor.com advisory board member David Wondrich, by an American bartender. (You can read Wondrich’s full history of the cocktail here.) And with Old Blighty playing host to the Olympics next month, no doubt the concoction will be on more menus than normal on both sides of the pond.

But if you need a refresher on making this classic, watch top mixologist and Liquor.com advisory board member Simon Ford demonstrate the proper technique in this short How to Cocktail video.

And you should also try a tasty variation on the traditional recipe. One of our favorites is the flavorful Raspberry Collins, which adds tart muddled berries to the mix.

Looking for something even fruitier? Fix the vodka-based Mango Collins that incorporates mango nectar and orange liqueur into the basic formula. It’s a perfect sipper for a day at the beach.

So get to shaking, and join us in toasting the new season. Cheers!

This article was originally published at Tom Collins Season. For more stories like this, subscribe to Liquor.com for the best of all things cocktails and spirits.


Tom Collins

Elaborate infusions and esoteric bitters are fun, but you don’t need anything fancy to create a great cocktail. Often, easy-to-source ingredients combined in simple packages result in the best drinks. Case in point: the Tom Collins, a classic cocktail featuring gin, lemon juice, simple syrup and club soda. The refreshing drink tastes like a spiked sparkling lemonade and is equipped with all you need to cool down on a hot day.

There’s some debate as to the cocktail’s origin. According to drinks historian David Wondrich, the Tom Collins is strikingly similar to the gin punches being served in London bars during the 19th century. An enterprising barkeep named John Collins named the concoction after himself, whether or not he invented it. But given that the cocktail was typically made with Old Tom gin, drinkers eventually took to requesting Tom rather than John Collinses.

The Tom Collins was immortalized in Harry Johnson’s 1882 book, “New and Improved Bartender’s Manual: Or How to Mix Drinks of the Present Style.” It remained popular over the decades and is still a prominent drink today, available at bars across the world. You don’t need to visit a bar to drink one, however. As the Tom Collins requires no special tools—not even a shaker or strainer—it’s a snap to make at home. Simply build the drink in a tall glass, add ice and an optional garnish, and you’re done. Take one refreshing sip, and you’ll quickly see why this cocktail lives up to its classic status.


Tom Collins

Elaborate infusions and esoteric bitters are fun, but you don’t need anything fancy to create a great cocktail. Often, easy-to-source ingredients combined in simple packages result in the best drinks. Case in point: the Tom Collins, a classic cocktail featuring gin, lemon juice, simple syrup and club soda. The refreshing drink tastes like a spiked sparkling lemonade and is equipped with all you need to cool down on a hot day.

There’s some debate as to the cocktail’s origin. According to drinks historian David Wondrich, the Tom Collins is strikingly similar to the gin punches being served in London bars during the 19th century. An enterprising barkeep named John Collins named the concoction after himself, whether or not he invented it. But given that the cocktail was typically made with Old Tom gin, drinkers eventually took to requesting Tom rather than John Collinses.

The Tom Collins was immortalized in Harry Johnson’s 1882 book, “New and Improved Bartender’s Manual: Or How to Mix Drinks of the Present Style.” It remained popular over the decades and is still a prominent drink today, available at bars across the world. You don’t need to visit a bar to drink one, however. As the Tom Collins requires no special tools—not even a shaker or strainer—it’s a snap to make at home. Simply build the drink in a tall glass, add ice and an optional garnish, and you’re done. Take one refreshing sip, and you’ll quickly see why this cocktail lives up to its classic status.


Tom Collins

Elaborate infusions and esoteric bitters are fun, but you don’t need anything fancy to create a great cocktail. Often, easy-to-source ingredients combined in simple packages result in the best drinks. Case in point: the Tom Collins, a classic cocktail featuring gin, lemon juice, simple syrup and club soda. The refreshing drink tastes like a spiked sparkling lemonade and is equipped with all you need to cool down on a hot day.

There’s some debate as to the cocktail’s origin. According to drinks historian David Wondrich, the Tom Collins is strikingly similar to the gin punches being served in London bars during the 19th century. An enterprising barkeep named John Collins named the concoction after himself, whether or not he invented it. But given that the cocktail was typically made with Old Tom gin, drinkers eventually took to requesting Tom rather than John Collinses.

The Tom Collins was immortalized in Harry Johnson’s 1882 book, “New and Improved Bartender’s Manual: Or How to Mix Drinks of the Present Style.” It remained popular over the decades and is still a prominent drink today, available at bars across the world. You don’t need to visit a bar to drink one, however. As the Tom Collins requires no special tools—not even a shaker or strainer—it’s a snap to make at home. Simply build the drink in a tall glass, add ice and an optional garnish, and you’re done. Take one refreshing sip, and you’ll quickly see why this cocktail lives up to its classic status.


Tom Collins

Elaborate infusions and esoteric bitters are fun, but you don’t need anything fancy to create a great cocktail. Often, easy-to-source ingredients combined in simple packages result in the best drinks. Case in point: the Tom Collins, a classic cocktail featuring gin, lemon juice, simple syrup and club soda. The refreshing drink tastes like a spiked sparkling lemonade and is equipped with all you need to cool down on a hot day.

There’s some debate as to the cocktail’s origin. According to drinks historian David Wondrich, the Tom Collins is strikingly similar to the gin punches being served in London bars during the 19th century. An enterprising barkeep named John Collins named the concoction after himself, whether or not he invented it. But given that the cocktail was typically made with Old Tom gin, drinkers eventually took to requesting Tom rather than John Collinses.

The Tom Collins was immortalized in Harry Johnson’s 1882 book, “New and Improved Bartender’s Manual: Or How to Mix Drinks of the Present Style.” It remained popular over the decades and is still a prominent drink today, available at bars across the world. You don’t need to visit a bar to drink one, however. As the Tom Collins requires no special tools—not even a shaker or strainer—it’s a snap to make at home. Simply build the drink in a tall glass, add ice and an optional garnish, and you’re done. Take one refreshing sip, and you’ll quickly see why this cocktail lives up to its classic status.


Tom Collins

Elaborate infusions and esoteric bitters are fun, but you don’t need anything fancy to create a great cocktail. Often, easy-to-source ingredients combined in simple packages result in the best drinks. Case in point: the Tom Collins, a classic cocktail featuring gin, lemon juice, simple syrup and club soda. The refreshing drink tastes like a spiked sparkling lemonade and is equipped with all you need to cool down on a hot day.

There’s some debate as to the cocktail’s origin. According to drinks historian David Wondrich, the Tom Collins is strikingly similar to the gin punches being served in London bars during the 19th century. An enterprising barkeep named John Collins named the concoction after himself, whether or not he invented it. But given that the cocktail was typically made with Old Tom gin, drinkers eventually took to requesting Tom rather than John Collinses.

The Tom Collins was immortalized in Harry Johnson’s 1882 book, “New and Improved Bartender’s Manual: Or How to Mix Drinks of the Present Style.” It remained popular over the decades and is still a prominent drink today, available at bars across the world. You don’t need to visit a bar to drink one, however. As the Tom Collins requires no special tools—not even a shaker or strainer—it’s a snap to make at home. Simply build the drink in a tall glass, add ice and an optional garnish, and you’re done. Take one refreshing sip, and you’ll quickly see why this cocktail lives up to its classic status.


Tom Collins

Elaborate infusions and esoteric bitters are fun, but you don’t need anything fancy to create a great cocktail. Often, easy-to-source ingredients combined in simple packages result in the best drinks. Case in point: the Tom Collins, a classic cocktail featuring gin, lemon juice, simple syrup and club soda. The refreshing drink tastes like a spiked sparkling lemonade and is equipped with all you need to cool down on a hot day.

There’s some debate as to the cocktail’s origin. According to drinks historian David Wondrich, the Tom Collins is strikingly similar to the gin punches being served in London bars during the 19th century. An enterprising barkeep named John Collins named the concoction after himself, whether or not he invented it. But given that the cocktail was typically made with Old Tom gin, drinkers eventually took to requesting Tom rather than John Collinses.

The Tom Collins was immortalized in Harry Johnson’s 1882 book, “New and Improved Bartender’s Manual: Or How to Mix Drinks of the Present Style.” It remained popular over the decades and is still a prominent drink today, available at bars across the world. You don’t need to visit a bar to drink one, however. As the Tom Collins requires no special tools—not even a shaker or strainer—it’s a snap to make at home. Simply build the drink in a tall glass, add ice and an optional garnish, and you’re done. Take one refreshing sip, and you’ll quickly see why this cocktail lives up to its classic status.


Tom Collins

Elaborate infusions and esoteric bitters are fun, but you don’t need anything fancy to create a great cocktail. Often, easy-to-source ingredients combined in simple packages result in the best drinks. Case in point: the Tom Collins, a classic cocktail featuring gin, lemon juice, simple syrup and club soda. The refreshing drink tastes like a spiked sparkling lemonade and is equipped with all you need to cool down on a hot day.

There’s some debate as to the cocktail’s origin. According to drinks historian David Wondrich, the Tom Collins is strikingly similar to the gin punches being served in London bars during the 19th century. An enterprising barkeep named John Collins named the concoction after himself, whether or not he invented it. But given that the cocktail was typically made with Old Tom gin, drinkers eventually took to requesting Tom rather than John Collinses.

The Tom Collins was immortalized in Harry Johnson’s 1882 book, “New and Improved Bartender’s Manual: Or How to Mix Drinks of the Present Style.” It remained popular over the decades and is still a prominent drink today, available at bars across the world. You don’t need to visit a bar to drink one, however. As the Tom Collins requires no special tools—not even a shaker or strainer—it’s a snap to make at home. Simply build the drink in a tall glass, add ice and an optional garnish, and you’re done. Take one refreshing sip, and you’ll quickly see why this cocktail lives up to its classic status.


Tom Collins

Elaborate infusions and esoteric bitters are fun, but you don’t need anything fancy to create a great cocktail. Often, easy-to-source ingredients combined in simple packages result in the best drinks. Case in point: the Tom Collins, a classic cocktail featuring gin, lemon juice, simple syrup and club soda. The refreshing drink tastes like a spiked sparkling lemonade and is equipped with all you need to cool down on a hot day.

There’s some debate as to the cocktail’s origin. According to drinks historian David Wondrich, the Tom Collins is strikingly similar to the gin punches being served in London bars during the 19th century. An enterprising barkeep named John Collins named the concoction after himself, whether or not he invented it. But given that the cocktail was typically made with Old Tom gin, drinkers eventually took to requesting Tom rather than John Collinses.

The Tom Collins was immortalized in Harry Johnson’s 1882 book, “New and Improved Bartender’s Manual: Or How to Mix Drinks of the Present Style.” It remained popular over the decades and is still a prominent drink today, available at bars across the world. You don’t need to visit a bar to drink one, however. As the Tom Collins requires no special tools—not even a shaker or strainer—it’s a snap to make at home. Simply build the drink in a tall glass, add ice and an optional garnish, and you’re done. Take one refreshing sip, and you’ll quickly see why this cocktail lives up to its classic status.


Tom Collins

Elaborate infusions and esoteric bitters are fun, but you don’t need anything fancy to create a great cocktail. Often, easy-to-source ingredients combined in simple packages result in the best drinks. Case in point: the Tom Collins, a classic cocktail featuring gin, lemon juice, simple syrup and club soda. The refreshing drink tastes like a spiked sparkling lemonade and is equipped with all you need to cool down on a hot day.

There’s some debate as to the cocktail’s origin. According to drinks historian David Wondrich, the Tom Collins is strikingly similar to the gin punches being served in London bars during the 19th century. An enterprising barkeep named John Collins named the concoction after himself, whether or not he invented it. But given that the cocktail was typically made with Old Tom gin, drinkers eventually took to requesting Tom rather than John Collinses.

The Tom Collins was immortalized in Harry Johnson’s 1882 book, “New and Improved Bartender’s Manual: Or How to Mix Drinks of the Present Style.” It remained popular over the decades and is still a prominent drink today, available at bars across the world. You don’t need to visit a bar to drink one, however. As the Tom Collins requires no special tools—not even a shaker or strainer—it’s a snap to make at home. Simply build the drink in a tall glass, add ice and an optional garnish, and you’re done. Take one refreshing sip, and you’ll quickly see why this cocktail lives up to its classic status.


Tom Collins

Elaborate infusions and esoteric bitters are fun, but you don’t need anything fancy to create a great cocktail. Often, easy-to-source ingredients combined in simple packages result in the best drinks. Case in point: the Tom Collins, a classic cocktail featuring gin, lemon juice, simple syrup and club soda. The refreshing drink tastes like a spiked sparkling lemonade and is equipped with all you need to cool down on a hot day.

There’s some debate as to the cocktail’s origin. According to drinks historian David Wondrich, the Tom Collins is strikingly similar to the gin punches being served in London bars during the 19th century. An enterprising barkeep named John Collins named the concoction after himself, whether or not he invented it. But given that the cocktail was typically made with Old Tom gin, drinkers eventually took to requesting Tom rather than John Collinses.

The Tom Collins was immortalized in Harry Johnson’s 1882 book, “New and Improved Bartender’s Manual: Or How to Mix Drinks of the Present Style.” It remained popular over the decades and is still a prominent drink today, available at bars across the world. You don’t need to visit a bar to drink one, however. As the Tom Collins requires no special tools—not even a shaker or strainer—it’s a snap to make at home. Simply build the drink in a tall glass, add ice and an optional garnish, and you’re done. Take one refreshing sip, and you’ll quickly see why this cocktail lives up to its classic status.